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INDUSTRY TODAY 127
LIBRELATO • PROFILE
and the articulated open-load semi-trailer (introduced in 2007).
“We don’t develop products just to transport goods. Rather, we
develop products designed to solve problems, and that is one of
our biggest strengths,” declares Librelato.
Indeed, product design pinpoints specific needs related to:
• Those who drive the trucks;
• Those who load cargo;
• Those who unload cargo.
In each case, the cargo may remain the same but the logistics,
requirements and culture of the involved professionals and busi-
nesses may be quite different. “Ultimately, we’re not just selling
a product, we’re selling a technology,” says Librelato.
Currently, the company focuses on developing technology
specifically geared to markets previously untapped or under-
exploited. These include sugar/alcohol, grains, liq-
uids/combustibles, and lumber segments. With this goal in mind,
Librelato’s engineers create prototypes for models that fill out
pre-existing lines and introduce new designs such as box trucks
and siders. “We constantly improve our products,” says
Librelato. “In Brazil, key transport issues relate to security and
weight. If you reduce cargo by 200 kilos, you’ll significantly
impact speed and safety. That’s why our engineers constantly
strive to come up with new solutions.”
UNCOMMON DIVERSITY
In a country where distances are enormous and railways are vir-
tually non-existent, it’s hardly surprising that the cargo truck
segment continues to grow in leaps and bounds. Last year, Brazil
sold 100,000 trucks. This year the number is expected to rise to
120,000. Librelato is positioned to expand along with the mar-
ket. Forward movement is further driven by the fact that its client
base is uncommonly diverse. “On one hand, we have Vale, the
largest mining company in the world,” indicates Librelato. “But
we also cater to a small town bakery. No matter their size, all
clients are equally important.”
Librelato further differentiates itself from competitors by
making itself quite active in the public sector. Indeed, the com-
pany considers this its trump card. It portfolio includes contracts
with numerous municipal, state and federal government organi-
zations. All of these entities invest in cargo vehicles. “In this seg-
ment, we’re the company that has experienced the most growth
in the last seven years,” reports Librelato.
The company is the fifth largest company in the sector. It then
pursued fourth-placement ranking within a year. This wasn’t a
great stretch. After all, Librelato has grown more than 1,000 per-
cent in the last several years. This growth has not only resulted
from the enlargement of it national distribution network; the
company is also investing in enlarging its output lines (via new
machines and equipment). Moreover, it has invested in new pro-
duction units in Criciúma and Içara, both in the south of Santa
Catarina. But, it doesn’t stop there: Company planning includes
the valorization of the human capital, presented by the contract-
ing and the qualification of hundreds of collaborators reached
after courses and training.
Growth indices were presented by Fábio Zomer, head of
Librelato’s Finance Department. Statistics indicate that new mar-
kets are being conquered each day, and Librelato is leaving many
competitors behind. In the months of February, May and July of
2010, it stamped in the fourth placement and closed last month
with a participation in the market of six percent.
Comparing the first quarters of 2008 and 2010, the market had
a fall of -2.42 percent while Librelato achieved growth indices
ONE OF BRAZIL’S LEADING MANUFACTURERS OF PRODUCTS AND ACCES-
SORIES FOR CARGO VEHICLES, LIBRELATO IS ON THE ROAD TO SERIOUS
GROWTH. COMPANY PRESIDENT JOSÉ CARLOS LIBRELATO SPOKE TO
MICHAEL SOMMERS ABOUT WHAT’S NEW: PRODUCTS, SALES CENTERS AND
OPPORTUNITIES,ASWELL AS A NEWPLANT AND PLANS TO TAKE THE 70-YEAR-
OLD FAMILY-OWNED COMPANY PUBLIC. BUT ONE ELEMENT WILL NEVER
CHANGE, AND THAT’S THE COMPANY’S COMMITMENT TO ITS CLIENTS AND
ITS WORKERS.